40 Years | Commitment equals success for Piranha Insurance

On November 30, the Piranha Insurance family officially celebrated 40 years at a special Christmas function hosted at Korte’s Resort at Parkhurst, North Rockhampton. Peter and Heather were surrounded by family, friends and employees.

As Peter Peirano reflected on forty years in business, he admitted the feeling to be bittersweet.

In an ever-changing world, Mr Peirano and his wife, Heather have been committed to their clientele which has proven to be a major factor in the business’ success.

“It’s a huge milestone for any business to survive…purely we’re doing something right,” Mr Peirano said.

And as loyalty runs deep within the culture of Piranha Insurance, it has earnt them the respect of their clients.

“I’ve always told our staff look after the client and the money will come…you’ve got to look after your customers,” Mr Peirano said.

“We’re very much face-to-face, they can have a cup of coffee…we need to get to the bottom of their insurance problem.”

And despite opportunities which have arisen to expand the outreach of the organisation, Mr Peirano said he remains committed to helping Central Queenslanders.

“We’ve always resisted going outside of Rockhampton, we just believe in this area,” Mr Peirano said.

And after four decades in the industry, Peter’s love of people has remained the same.

Looking back to the beginning of his business journey, Mr Peirano said a chance meeting with an industry professional helped him establish a career.

Mr Peirano owned a slot car track, and one day he had been ten pin bowling when a man by the name Revel Henry from the Colonial Mutual Life Insurance had found him to be an effective communicator.

“I did an apprenticeship with Colonial Mutual Life Insurance and then I eventually moved to Mercantile Mutual Life Insurance and I virtually stayed with them through a number of life changes,” Mr Peirano said.

Mr Peirano stayed with Mercantile Mutual Life Insurance for 39 years.

With many years of experience behind him, Mr Peirano purchased the current Piranha Insurance premises at 168 Denison St in Rockhampton 29 years ago.

Peter and Heather have since created a warm working environment for his staff which has helped their organisation prosper over the decades.

“They’re all my family, I’ve watched them grow up,” Mr Peirano said. “It’s tremendous to see young kids grow into great young adults.”

Born in March 1953, Mr Peirano hailed from Duaringa where his father had owned the local butcher shop from 1952 – 1979.

While the Piranha Insurance owner said the thought of his business’ milestone brought him joy, he felt sad to think he no longer worked from the office to do what he does best – communicating with people.

The business is now in the capable hands of principal Broker, Heather Peirano, Senior Brokers, Ross Hudson, Nathan Peirano and Tracey Cook and our efficient support crew Lorraine Tree, Astrid West, Morgan Matthews, Elise Safstrom, Hannah Balgowan and Lara Thackeray.

For all of your insurance needs, visit the team at Piranha Insurance today at 168 Denison Street, Rockhampton or phone 07 4927 8400 for any enquiries.

That’s not a cyclone…this is a cyclone

That’s not a cyclone…this is a cyclone

Although the effects of Cyclones Debbie, Yasi, Marcia and Larry are generally well known, these are dwarfed by Cyclone Mahina.

Cyclone Mahina is the deadliest cyclone in recorded Australian history, striking Bathurst Bay in Cape York on the 4th March 1899, with its destructive winds and storm surge combining to kill over 400 people. Thankfully, storms like this occur extremely rarely, with research by scientists finding that “on average”’ super cyclones occur in the region only once every two or three centuries.

A pearling fleet was anchored in or near the bay before the storm, but within an hour the fleet had either been driven ashore, onto the reef, or sunk at their anchorages.

A storm surge, reportedly 13 metres high, swept across Princess Charlotte Bay and then 5 kilometres inland destroying anything left of the fleet and the settlement. Apart from the sailors, around 100 indigenous

Australians were killed, but as indigenous people were not counted as part of the population at the time, no accurate numbers are known. Tragically, they had tried to help the shipwrecked survivors, but the back surge caught them and swept them away.

Thousands of fish and some sharks and

dolphins were found several kilometres inland and on Flinders Island, dolphins were found on the 15.2 metre cliffs.

The cyclone continued southwest over Cape York Peninsula, emerging into the Gulf of Carpentaria before doubling back and dissipating on the 10th March. Measuring cyclones is a complicated task as the biggest or strongest are often not the most

destructive, but one good measure of

intensity is pressure.

The lower the pressure, the more air gets sucked into the cyclone and this ultimately results in more power. A study in 2014, found the lowest pressure of around 880 hectopascals for Mahina, based upon modelling of meteorological variables needed to induce the world record setting surge height…by comparison, Cyclone Yasi was 930 hectopascals.

Hopefully, we won’t see anything like Cyclone Mahina in 2017/18, but Queensland, and more particularly North Queensland, is facing another nervous cyclone season, with weather forecasters predicting a dozen cyclones could form off the Australian coast this summer. Of those, up to four could cross the Queensland coast, but even tropical cyclones which do not make the coast can still have a significant impact on coastal communities. Heavy rainfall causing major flooding, storm surges causing coastal inundation and destructive winds causing damage to property and infrastructure are a common occurrence.

 

BREAK OUT:

The State Emergency Service recommend having an Emergency Kit ready for storm season that contains essential items you may need during and after a severe storm.

An Emergency Kit contains essential items that you and other members of your household may need during and after a severe storm.